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Veterinary Medicine Internships in Mexico

  • Placement locations: Guadalajara
  • Role: To shadow and assist a local vet
  • Requirements: Interns need to have completed at least three years of veterinary medicine studies at university.
  • Type of placement: Veterinary clinic
  • Accommodation: Host family
  • Length of placement: From 3 weeks
  • Start dates: Flexible

Projects Abroad Veterinary Medicine interns live and work in Guadalajara, our main base in Mexico. Guadalajara is a large city where many people have pets in their homes, but not everyone can afford expensive veterinary care. The city therefore has several public animal clinics, where cheaper treatments are available. The city also has a problem with abandoned pets after people realize they cannot afford the costs of pet ownership.

Working as a veterinary intern will allow you to gain invaluable experience of a wide range of treatments and veterinary practices in Mexico. Shadowing and helping local vets will give you knowledge of diseases that are uncommon elsewhere in North America and will provide a better understanding of the problems that local vets face. By showing enthusiasm and displaying your knowledge, the local vets may allow you to get involved in a wide range of hands-on and practical treatments.

All interns joining the Veterinary Medicine project in Mexico need to have completed at least three years of veterinary studies at the university level. If you do not have three years of experience or you prefer a more care-based role, you can work with birds, reptiles, and other non-domestic animals on our Animal Care in Mexico project.

Veterinary Medicine Experience in Mexico with Projects Abroad

Intern on the Veterinary Medicine project in Mexico treats a cat

Interns work in a large clinic in central Guadalajara. At the clinic interns are involved in all the treatments given to the animals. The majority of animals treated are domestic pets such as cats, dogs, and birds, but occasionally exotic animals are brought to the clinic for treatment. Interns will sit in on the general consultations with the animals and their owners, observe surgeries, assist with x-rays, and help with animal physical therapy treatments.

As an intern, on your first day at work you will be assigned a project supervisor who will be able to advise and support you during your internship, and of course our Projects Abroad staff are always on hand too.

This placement is happy to receive interns who speak minimal Spanish, although please be aware that the more Spanish you do speak and understand the more you will get from the project. We encourage all interns to try and learn as much Spanish as possible before arriving or consider taking a Spanish Language Course before or during your Veterinary Medicine internship.

Please note that this project is closed for two weeks over the Easter and Christmas vacations and is also closed for the first two weeks of August. During these times you may be interested in joining the Animal Care or Conservation programs.

You can join the Veterinary Medicine project in Mexico for three weeks if you don't have time to join us for four weeks or more. This project has been selected by our local colleagues as being suitable for shorter durations for both the host community and the volunteer. Although you will gain valuable cultural insight and work intensely within the local community please be aware that you may not be able to make the same impact as someone participating for a longer period.

All volunteers participating on standard projects in Mexico have the opportunity to spend one week on a Conservation & Environment project at the end of their main placement. For more information, please visit our Sea-Turtle and Coastal Conservation & Environment Project in Mexico page. Our Combinations Page explains how you can combine not only projects, but also destinations.

Volunteer Profile Volunteer Stacy Barr shares her story from the Veterinary Medicine project in Mexico
Stacy Barr
Whilst I was there I helped the staff release some animals, ranging from iguanas to squirrels and coatis. We visited a canyon just outside the city that was filled with monkeys, waterfalls and some quite treacherous roads. La Barranca, the canyon, was an amazing place to go as the city was so close, but in the depths of the canyon it felt as if the city was hundreds of miles away. Read more...

If you have qualifications or experience in this field then we can make use of your skills volunteering abroad as a professional in Mexico.

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