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Volunteer OverseasVolunteer Overseas

Winter is Coming – What’s Your Escape Plan?

Join Projects Abroad on a two-week trip to Sri Lanka, Fiji, or Ghana, and stay warm this winter while helping communities abroad

Projects Abroad volunteers play a game outdoors with children at a care center in Sri Lanka.

Projects Abroad volunteers play a game outdoors with children at a care center in Sri Lanka.

NEW YORK – September 16, 2015 – The heat of summer is fading, giving way to cooler temperatures and golden foliage. Fall is here – and winter is coming. If you are eager to escape heavy snowfalls and chilly temperatures over the winter break and end-of-year holidays, travel abroad to warmer climates. But what if you could do more than just relax and soak up the sunshine in an exotic destination? What if you could give back to the local community at the same time?

Projects Abroad offers a range of short-term volunteer group trips over the winter break, taking participants to one of three beautiful destinations: Sri Lanka, Fiji, or Ghana. These trips take place over two weeks and are suitable for everyone, including first-time travelers, students, and professionals who have limited time off over the holidays.

Winter Break Trips are designed with short-term impact in mind, says Mia Olesen, a Program Advisor for Projects Abroad USA. “We understand that it may not always be possible for volunteers to devote months to a project, so we ensure that our short-term programs make the most of every minute that our volunteers have to give to communities. This summer, more than 1000 North American volunteers traveled with us on two-week trips, including around 400 high school students. They made a tangible difference in the communities we work in, such as the new kitchen built for Likii Academy in Kenya, and the vegetable and flower garden planted at a Cambodian care center. If a volunteer joins a Winter Break Trip, they have the same potential for positive change wherever they choose to go.”

Each Winter Break Trip involves working with a group of volunteers and the organization offers two different types of programs: Care & Community and Medicine. Care & Community programs combine practical work with children with painting or renovation work at the placement. On a Medicine program, volunteers receive a comprehensive overview of medicine and medical practices in a developing country, adding valuable experience to resumes and giving volunteers the chance to gain practical skills on outreaches.

“Our Medicine programs over the winter break are especially useful for high school graduates and pre-med students building resumes for medical school,” Olesen comments, adding, “Of course, this is a great placement for anyone with a strong interest in medicine, as well as those studying or working in healthcare fields such as nursing and community health who want to gain experience abroad.”

For more information on how to get involved with short-term group trips this winter, please visit www.projects-abroad.org/volunteer-projects/winter-break-trips.

About Projects Abroad

Projects Abroad was founded in 1992 by Dr. Peter Slowe, a geography professor, as a program for students to travel and work while on break from full-time study. The program had its genesis in post-USSR Romania, where students were given the chance to teach conversational English. After a few years just sending volunteers to Eastern Europe for teaching, the company expanded to sending volunteers of all ages around the world on a wide range of projects.

Projects Abroad is a global leader in short-term international volunteer programs with projects in 28 countries and recruitment offices in the UK, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Holland, Hong Kong, Norway, Poland, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, and the United States.

For details on volunteering abroad, visit Projects Abroad’s web site at www.projects-abroad.org.

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